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Canadian Women Marching in Washington: Feminist Solidarity in Historical Perspective

by Joan Sangster

A friend’s daughter set out yesterday from Montreal for Washington to join American protests timed to coincide with the inauguration of Donald Trump. She may not know that she is marching in a long Canadian tradition of cross-border feminist solidarity going back to a 1913 suffrage demonstration, also timed to coincide with a presidential inauguration.

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The Democratic Project: 20 Chinese Women’s Attitudes towards Suffrage and Referendum

by Huai Bao

There is insufficient credible scholarship on women and politics in the People’s Republic of China (PRC). Chinese scholarship suffers from unsympathetic scrutiny and editing by state authorities, while language, cultural, and institutional barriers limit access by most Western scholars of women’s politics to Chinese first-person accounts.

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Married Women, Race, Ethnicity, and Suffrage: A History of Exclusion

by Philip Girard

We all know that Canadian women, with the exception of some Aboriginal and Asian women, acquired the federal vote in 1918, right? Well, not actually. The vote is tied to citizenship (or, as it was called prior to 1947, nationality), and the issue of whether the wives of newly naturalized immigrant men should be able to vote remained a live one until Canada adopted its own Citizenship Act in 1946, with effect from 1 January 1947.

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Revisiting the Rise of Women in Canadian Politics

by Grace Lore

Between November 2008 when Eva Aariak, the only woman elected to Nunavut’s 19-member legislature was sworn in as premier and January 2013 when Kathleen Wynne became premier of Ontario after taking over as Liberal leader, six women in five provinces and one territory rose to the top.  Four – BC’s Christy Clark, Newfoundland and Labrador’s Kathy Dunderdale, Alberta’s Alison Redford, and Ontario’s Kathleen Wynne, like the Canadian women leaders before them (Rita Johnston in BC and Kim Campbell federally), became premier /prime minister by winning the leadership of their party and not by seeking an electoral mandate.

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A discussion with Waterloo Mayor Brenda Halloran

by Grace Lore

Women remain under-represented in politics the world over and Canada is no exception. While municipal politics was once thought to provide a better opportunity for women to enter into and participate in politics, it is far from certain.  According to the Federation of Canadian Municipalities, less than 25% of all city counselors are women and women comprise a mere 16% of all mayors.

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Is there a rape culture in politics?

by Grace Lore

‘Rape culture’ is the social practices, public and private discourses, and beliefs that enable us as individuals and a community to ignore sexualized violence against women and fail to attribute appropriate blame and punishment to perpetrators.   Rape culture at its most innocuous passively enables sexualized violence and at its worst reproduces, condones, or encourages it.

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Canadian 2013 By-elections: Porous politics, vote-splitting, and women’s presence in politics

by Grace Lore

On 25 November2013, voters in four Canadian ridings went to the polls to elect a new Member of Parliament in mid-term by-elections.  The seats were left empty when four MP’s resigned: namely Manitoba Conservatives Vic Toews and Merv Tweed to join the private sector, Quebec Liberal and former interim leader, Denis Coderre, to become mayor of Montreal, and former interim Liberal leader Bob Rae to serve as negotiator for the Matawa First Nations in Northern Ontario. While two races (Toronto-Centre and Brandon-Souris) were highly contested, after the vote count there was no change to the status quo; the Liberals retained seats in Toronto and Montreal and the Conservatives theirs in Manitoba.

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Armine Nutting Gosling (1861-1942) and “The Counsel of Responsible Women”: The Suffragists of Newfoundland and Labrador

by Tiffany Johnstone

While most women in Canada won the right to vote at the federal level in 1918 and to run as candidates in federal elections in 1920, the struggle for suffrage was more complicated in the province of Quebec and in what was then the dominion of Newfoundland and Labrador (NL).  Quebec women had to wait 15 years before winning the right to vote provincially in 1940.  Newfoundland and Labrador, which did not join Canada until 1949, granted women the right to vote and run for office in 1925.  Religious conservatism, entrenched class-based social inequalities, and a strong cultural emphasis on traditional gender roles seem to have posed particular obstacles to suffrage in Quebec and NL.  The story in NL is remarkable considering the number of challenges and the public opposition suffragists faced at the time.

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Challenging the Anointed Prince: Claim Making and Policy Building in the 2013 Canadian Liberal Leadership Race

by Kelsey Wrightson

The Liberal Party faced an unprecedented challenge after the 2 May 2011 election, its worst electoral result since 1867. The oldest party in Canada, led by historian Michael Ignatieff, a new leader who was thought to have ‘royal jelly’, captured only 19% of the popular vote, and 34 seats across Canada. This dismal showing was the first time in Canadian history that the Liberal Party could form neither the government nor the official opposition. Ignatieff was defeated in his Etobicoke riding and shortly resigned, leaving Bob Rae, a Liberal M.P. but previously a  contender for the Liberal leadership and a N.D.P. premier of Ontario, to serve as interim leader. For the next two years, the Grits struggled to regroup and reformulate.

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